Prof. Emilio Ovuga, Gulu University

 Emilio Ovuga, PhD, is Professor of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Gulu University. Dr. Ovuga holds a joint Doctor of Philosophy in Suicidology and Suicide Prevention, and Psychiatric Epidemiology of Karolinska Institutet and Makerere University. Dr. Ovuga is the founding Chairman of Bomvitae Agro-Industries Limited (BAIL) whose goal is to develop agricultural technologies to diversify agricultural practices and food production to feed the hungry in conflict-ridden Sub-Saharan Africa. He is the SASA Vice-President for the Africa Region. Dr. Ovuga served as Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at Gulu University (2006-2012). He was the founding Chairman of the Forum of Research and Ethics Chairpersons in Uganda (FRECU) (2009-2015) and, of Gulu University Research and Ethics Committee (GUREC) (2007-2017). Dr. Ovuga has held various positions of responsibility at Makerere University from 1989-2006; as Psychiatrist at Mathare Mental Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya (1981-1982); Provincial Psychiatrist in Western Kenya (1982-1984); and Senior Psychiatrist in the Transkei Homeland of South Africa (1984-1989). Dr.  Ovuga has developed and promoted a sustainable research culture at Gulu University, which was established in Northern Uganda in 2004. Consequently undergraduate students of Gulu University are able to conduct research and publish their research findings in international peer-reviewed journals. He has empowered communities to take charge and responsibility of their social and health situations and in improving their relations with government departments. Dr. Ovuga contributed to the establishment of the African Program for Onchocerciasis Control (A.P.O.C.) as a member of the WHO/TDR research team on the psychosocial importance of, and treatment of onchocerciasis in Sub Saharan Africa (SSA). Dr. Ovuga is a researcher, educator, administrator, mentor, and has conducted research and mentored students in wide-ranging fields in health, social sciences, business, agriculture and ICT.

 

Events:
Improving Health Research and Disease Surveillance Education